Women and Families

Evaluations Into Our Work With Women and Families

The Benefits Of Early Intervention – Evaluation Of The CAFÉ Gamechangers Project

Date: 2013

Evaluated by: Frontier Economics

Project overview: Gamechangers aims to reach the most marginalised families and help break the cycles of crime, poverty and unemployment they often face. Gamechangers is innovative drawing on a combination of St Giles experience working with gangs allied with conventional family support workers.

Key outcomes:

  • Some local authorities estimate that they spend up to 10 times more on troubled families than on ‘average’ families - the overall cost of troubled families the public purse is in the region of £9bn
  • Helping ex-offenders find work can reducing their likelihood of re-offending which is very costly. The cost of keeping a male in prison for a year alone exceeds £28,000 (Interface Enterprises Cost Calculator) while career criminals cost society around £1.2m
  • There is substantial evidence linking child outcomes at age 3 to later childhood and adulthood development in several areas including crime, education, health and employment.

To date, the project has achieved very positive outcomes including (not limited to):

  • Finding temporary accommodation for 23 families and permanent accommodation for 10 families and saving 17 families from eviction
  • Supporting 20 families with improving their children’s school attendance
  • Supporting 15 clients to access drug support services and 6 clients to access alcohol support services
  • Training people to NVQ level 3 in Information Advice and Guidance (IAG) groups, with 20 local people (under 35) gaining the qualification.

Footsteps Evaluation

Evaluated by: AVA (Action Against Violence)

Methodology:

  • Collation of key metrics identifying the number of clients worked with and the support they have received, including identification of any specialist services they are engaged with as a result of the Footsteps project.
  • Footsteps clients’ responses to a service specific evaluation ‘wellbeing survey’ - to be completed on entry to the service and then on a quarterly basis going forwards. This survey presents seven key indicators for both mental health and social inclusion from REVA outcomes framework[1] and the Warwick Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale[2]
  • On-going monitoring of the Footsteps women's groups and wellbeing of those taking part.
  • Focus groups and interviews (either over the phone or face to face) with Footsteps clients, providing an opportunity for clients to share their experiences of the service.
  • Interviews with Footsteps staff team, providing an opportunity for staff to highlight achievements, learning and challenges faced.
  • Case studies of Footsteps clients

Project overview:

Footsteps is a two-year project, funded by The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, which has been delivered across three geographical areas in England: Yorkshire, Norfolk and London. The project sought to make a difference to women with autism or personality disorder(s) who have been involved in the criminal justice system and who face multiple disadvantages through a) the delivery of a holistic, person-centred and trauma informed support service.

Key outcomes:

  • Footsteps was able to support 296 women referred in to the service over the two years of project delivery.
  • Analysis of responses from the eight professionals working directly with clients finds that 100% agreed that the project had had a positive impact on the women they were (jointly) working with.
  • Between the launch of the service in September 2018 and January 2020, 12 volunteers supported the Footsteps project.
  • Footsteps caseworkers supported clients to a total of 969 appointments over the course of the project. This averages out at women being supported to 44 appointments per month. This includes medical, mental health, alcohol services and rehab appointments.
  • Following an average of six months additional support from Footsteps, the number of clients feeling isolated or alone decreased from 65% to 37%.
  • Following an average of six months additional support from Footsteps, the number of clients who felt able to deal with daily life at least most of the time increased from 53% to 74%. The number of clients taking care of themselves either ‘most’ or ‘all of the time’ increased from 40% to 67%.
  • 95% of the responses to Women’s group feedback forms indicated that women had felt able to meet new people and build positive connections through accessing the group.
  • 100% of women providing feedback via women’s group feedback forms indicated that they would recommend it.

Lambeth Family Gangs

Date: 2018

Evaluated by: Confluence Partnerships

Methodology:

Data was gathered over three months during early 2018 by an independent evaluator using the following means:

  • 1:1 interview with caseworker
  • Face to face and telephone interviews with four professionals who have referred young people to the project
  • Telephone interviews with two parents whose children have been referred to the project
  • Case file review
  • Analysis of monthly monitoring data
  • Review of reporting feedback to project funder

Project overview:

Lambeth Family Gangs project exists to provide holistic support to families in the borough who are affected by the current or previous gang involvement of one family member, which can cause trauma and disruption to the whole family. The nature of the support provided involves offering help around issues such as housing, liaising with the authorities and supporting the children and young people in the family to stay engaged with education and employment.

Key outcomes:

  • 38 direct beneficiaries, all of which were children, young people and their families affected by gang activity in Lambeth
  • 85% of the 60 families who engage with us report feelings of safety as a result of our involvement with them
  • 60% of Parents and siblings experience reduced social isolation, through engaging with local community networks and meeting others facing similar challenges
  • At least 85% of families have the confidence/ability to access support such as counselling, health professionals, communicating with schools, probation, improving the welfare of all family members.

Children of Prisoners Empowered (COPE) Interim Evaluation

Date: 2020

Evaluated by: Confluence Partnerships

Method:

  • Telephone interview with COPE caseworker
  • Telephone interview with a referring professional (Children’s Centre family support worker)
  • Telephone interviews with two families currently being supported by COPE
  • Case studies of work with children and young people prepared by the caseworker
  • Analysis of project monitoring data

Project overview:

Children of Prisoners empowered (COPE) is a Leeds community based service delivering intensive support to disadvantaged children and young people affected by a parent's imprisonment in HMP Leeds, HMP New Hall and HMP Wealstun.

Key outcomes:

Over year one of the COPE project:

  • COPE is exceeding it’s target referral numbers – 39 young people and children ages 0-18 referred over the first year. It’s target for the two year project is 50.
  • 10 instances of clients having significantly improved home lives, 11 instances of improved ability to express feelings and 4 instances reduced isolation.

Children and Families Cymru Service Evaluation

Children and Families Cymru Service Evaluation

Date: 2020

Evaluated by: Confluence Partnerships

Method:

  • Dip sample case file review (3 cases)
  • Analysis of progress data (from Monthly Progress Reporting database)
  • Analysis of monitoring data (collated by St. Giles for inclusion in 2019 report to funder)
  • Review of past reports to project funder (2016, 2018, 2019)
  • Face to face interviews with the current, and the previous caseworker
  • Face to face interviews with three colleagues who work alongside the service
  • Telephone interviews with two current users of the service
  • Telephone interview with one professional who has referred families to the service

Project overview

St Giles’s Children and Families Cymru service has been operating since 2012. Since its inception, the aim of the project has been to support families struggling to cope as a result of experiencing difficulties and having a range of complex, inter-connected and unmet needs. The Children and Families Cymru service operates predominantly in the Vale of Glamorgan and Cardiff, providing intensive intervention for vulnerable families who have complex needs and are trapped in cycles of offending, poverty and disadvantage.

Key outcomes

  • Between 2019 – 2020, the Children and Families Cymru caseworker has provided support to 31 families in line with target numbers cited in the project proposal.
  • All thirty one families (100%) supported during the period have an improved living environment - including access to sustained housing; claiming appropriate and relevant benefits; debt management plan in place; tenancy maintenance plan in place; and engaging with health services.
  • Twenty seven families (87%) report improved wellbeing.
  • Nineteen families (60%) experienced improved relationships, including healthier family relationships; actively engaging with relevant services including social services, YOT, Probation and school; and engaging in positive activities/local community groups.
  • Twenty-one families (67%) have been recorded as engaging actively with ETE or another positive activity. Indicators include having an ETE action plan in place; actively searching and/or applying for work; accessing training; engaging with education; and engaging in some other positive, meaningful activity.

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